Matanuska-Susitna Borough

FAQs

There are plans for a rail line at Port MacKenzie. The Alaska Railroad (ARRC) has teamed with the Matanuska-Susitna Borough (MSB) to design and construct a rail extension from the Parks Highway to Port MacKenzie. The rail extension project is owned and operated by ARRC, and the MSB, as owner of Port MacKenzie, is the project sponsor. The Surface Transportation Board (STB) has approved the Environmental Impact Statement and selected a route to construct a 32.1 mile rail line from the Parks Highway to Port MacKenzie.

We have secured much of the funding needed to begin construction of the rail extension, but are waiting on the Record of Decision before procurement can begin. More detailed information on the Port MacKenzie Rail Extension project may be found at www.portmacrail.com or on the ARRC’s website at: www.alaskarailroad.com under “solicitations.” This legacy project will be of great benefit to the entire State of Alaska by providing a shorter distance to tidewater for bulk transport of goods and commodities between Port MacKenzie and Interior Alaska. The rail extension has the potential to open new markets for minerals and stimulate the creation of new Alaskan jobs.

All handling, loading, and unloading services are the responsibility of the shipper, vessel owner, or agent. Completion of the Port MacKenzie Terminal Operator Permit is required for any qualified agent desiring to provide longshore services at the terminal facilities.

A privately owned 5’ wide conveyor capable of loading bulk commodities at 2,000 tons/hour. A 230 ton Manitowoc and a 3900 Manitowoc crawler crane (100 ton) are available for lease.

Contractors responsibility is to plow mainline routes, school bus routes, and all the pavement first.  They are then responsible for secondary routes and finally residential streets and roads.   The Contractor also has,  by contract, 48 hours to complete an initial plowing following a storm event.

Contact Public Works to submit sign requests. Requestor will need to provide location and contact information. A petition from residents along the subject road is helpful. The Borough will look at the road and evaluate the need and if warranted determine a suitable location. The requestor will be notified of the determination. The Borough will then install the sign when conditions permit.

For interest in using port, contact:
Therese Dolan, Port Operations Manager
therese.dolan@matsugov.us
(907) 861-7799

No, not unless there are weight restrictions in place, and then all we can do is caution them that they may be exceeding those restrictions. The public roads are just that, public.  We cannot restrict the use of the roads to any one user just because someone does not want them using them.

Everyone pays road tax as part of their tax assessment.  If you reside or own property in a designated RSA, you are responsible to pay your fair share of those maintenance costs incurred by that RSA.

Port MacKenzie is located in Upper Cook Inlet which has a tidal range of 41 feet, among the highest in the world. Port MacKenzie consists of a 14.7 acres barge dock with a 500’ bulkhead at -20’ mean lower low water (MLLW), a 1,200’ long deep-draft dock at -60’ MLLW, and 9,033 acres (14 square miles) of adjacent uplands which are available for commercial lease. There is a filter rock ramp adjacent to the south wingwall of the barge dock which is useable one hour before high tide until one hour after high tide for vessels with ramps. The barge dock has a gravel surface with a load capacity of 1,000 lbs./sq ft. The deep-draft dock is equipped with a 5’ wide conveyor system capable of loading bulk commodities at 2,000 tons/hour. There is a 7,000 square foot terminal building located on the barge dock with office space available for lease.

The road must be certified by the Borough that it is constructed to Borough standards.  If it is not, that is the responsibility of the residents on that road to bear the costs of bringing it up to a certifiable condition.  After that is done, the residents can petition or request the Borough inspect it again and consider it for maintenance if it meets the required standards.

This is something that comes through the local RSA board during the CIP process.  If you want a street light you must make your local board aware of your request and they will bring it forward as a request on the CIP list.  One of the major criteria for street lights is intersections that are also school bus stops.

Dust control for gravel roads are a CIP (Capital Improvement Program) issue and must start at the local RSA board level for nomination and inclusion in the program. The Road Superintendents will also place very dusty roads in the nomination process with the RSA board during the development of the CIP list.

We have the deepest draft capability in upper Cook Inlet. The largest vessel we have docked at our Port has been a Super Panamax vessel with a length of 754’ and depth of 45.3’; we have docked many Panamax Class vessels and have the capability of docking Cape Class vessels. The face of our Deep-Draft dock is 1200’ at -60’ at Mean Lower Low Water (MLLW).

Latitude: 61° degrees, 16' minutes, north 05.1975; Longitude: 149° degrees, 55' minutes, west 01.4174

Port MacKenzie has 3-Phase electrical power, power capstans, quick release hooks, two fire hydrants, high mast lights, and a telephone booth. Fuel service, waste oil disposal, and garbage disposal may be contracted as needed.

We specialize in bulk commodities such as gravel, coal, wood chips, cement, etc. However, we have also shipped modular homes, oil field modules for the North Slope, logs, and heavy equipment.

Most of our exports have gone to the North Slope, South Korea, Japan, and China.

Contact the Borough’s Land Department for information on leasing property at (907) 861-7869. Business or Non-Profit Lease and Permit applications can be found on the Land Management Forms page.

Speed bumps/humps are a maintenance concern both in maintaining them and for equipment.  They are also a liability for two wheel traffic both motorcycles and bicycles.

It does absolutely no good to grade a dry road, it actually does more damage than good as it causes to road surface to unravel and it pulls the larger rocks in the surface loose.  It also removes the fines from the surface, and it is that material that binds the top portion of the road together.

The RSA Contractors are required (by contract) to “minimize snow berms” as best as can be expected and they are allowed to leave a berm of 12 inches or less and no more than 24 inches at the base in driveways. Any berms left in front of mailboxes are the responsibility of the resident, but again the contractors are asked to try and minimize the size and depth of the snow left behind. This is all due to economics, the RSA cannot bear the costs of a no berm policy.

This is what we should be doing, we could then grade roads all summer and not have to wait for natural moisture (rain) to occur.  The practice of pre-watering the roads prior to grading is cost prohibitive, that is the only reason we do not do this.

This question has to be directed to your local RSA board for inclusion in the CIP (Capital Improvement Program) process.

These types of signs are thought to be a means of traffic calming, and they do not work in that capacity. The Borough posts speed limits that appropriate for residential areas and the enforcement of those speed limits are not within the powers of the Borough.

The RSA budgets cannot afford the cost to do this.